Dog Safety Tips For Halloween


A few tips that might help keep everyone safe!

Exercise your dog before the trick or treat begins. If you’re short on time, a 10 minute fetch game will help too.

Know your dog. It’s better to be safe then sorry. Think in advance. Think about what you are going to do this evening with your dog. If your dog is hyperactive, older, a young teething puppy or very introverted then it’s probably best to gate your dog. Putting your dog in a room with the door shut can create separation anxiety. So baby-gating your dog within a room is best. Music is key. This will mellow your dog and set the tone to a calmer mood. Then you can treat your dog to his favorite chew bone.

Never leave your dog outdoors in the yard on Halloween! This is a bad thing to do. No matter what size your dog is, this is teaching your dog to protect your territory and potentially get teased or hurt. They could even hurt a child who may open the gate by mistake. All animals should be indoors on Halloween.

If you want your dog to be apart of the party, do it safely. Have your dog on a leash with you. Yes, even in the house for an hour. That way you can answer the door and guide your dog to sit and stay as a trick and then treated! Teach your dog to sit and stay at the front door on a leash. Use it as a great training opportunity!

No chocolate or candy allowed.

Oh, and keep cats inside tonight. Happy Halloween!

Ask Inger: How Do I Introduce My NEW Dog To My Cat?

Q:

Hi Inger!

My puppy, Hanni, is a 9-month-old Jack Russell mix, and we’ve had her about 6 weeks now. She has mainly been in in the kitchen since her arrival and we crate her at bedtime. We also have a 4 year old cat, India. India has basically been hibernating upstairs in the bedrooms and only comes downstairs to use the litter box and eat. We’re beginning to introduce Hanni to other parts of the house, and now India is hiding in closets, under beds, etc. My kids and I fear that she’ll remain in isolation forever! We feel badly for India because we don’t want her to feel unloved and replaced. Hanni hasn’t been aggressive with India, just excited and very curious. What do we do? Should we have puppy/kitty dates where we introduce them slowly?

Best regards,

Ellen C.

A:

Dear Ellen,

First of all, great job on beginning crate training! That said, I have a few suggestions for you to try:

1. Hanni’s crate needs to be moved around the house at different times of the day. Use a corral, or exercise pen, to give her an area where she can relax and chill out in different areas of the house and put the crate inside this area so that she can go in and out as she pleases. Make sure you put soft music on and give her water and a chew bone. This way she is being socialized to the different sights, sounds and smells of your daily life in different parts of your house without your cat being in danger.

2. Move Hanni’s crate up to your bedroom at night so that she becomes part of the bedtime ritual. Take her outside on a leash to potty and then back upstairs and into her crate for the night. Routine and structure is essential.

3. India should be allowed to be socialized to Hanni at her own pace. It may take time, but implementing corrals and baby gates in your home allow her to feel safe while your cat and dog can still see and smell each other. These gated areas keep curious and excited Hanni in check, while India has the choice to jump over and visit if she wants to! Don’t force the integration process by having puppy/kitty dates, as this could exacerbate India’s stress and fear.

Good Luck!

Inger

Is your dog a breedist?

My dog seems to like some breeds and hate others. Is my dog a breedist? Is that even possible?

Like with people, it’s true some dogs dig each other and some just don’t. However, it’s more of an age, temperament, or sometimes a socialization issue or lack thereof, than anything else. Breedist? No, although sometimes it may appear that way. I have seen it all; German Shepherds that are sweet and demure and Chihuahuas who could benefit from anger management classes. The main point to note, my lovely dog owners, is that the way you train, socialize and manage the exercise needs of your pooch will determine your dog’s success at social events. Dominant dogs usually have high energy and prey drives, and they can come in all sizes. Other dogs can react to their energy in either a proactive (wanting to play and party) or a reactive way (barking back) and the way you handle it determines the outcome!

Yes, some breeds can have common “wired for sound energies” that many owners can find challenging to handle. The mixology and the chemistry (love/hate) have less to do with your dog being a breedist and actually have more to do with you the dog owner being perceptive! By being a little more perceptive to the age of the dog that is coming toward you while on a walk and communicating with other dog owners prior to approaching one another, can have the most amazing “peace pipe” effect on a potentially hairy situation. Just paws for a minute and assess the situation is what I always say. Walking by a dog, that your dog does not like, and both dogs appear to be out of control, at the end of the leash, is enough to make anyone drink!

If life get’s ruff. You’re energy flow can show your dog a different way. With just a tail wag and a nod you can avert the whole disagreement and heel thy self over to the sunny side of the street.

Ah, there are SO many factors that make up the canine cocktail of love. Happy walking!