Can Dog Food Affect Dog Training? Paws For A Minute Quick TIps

Can the way feed your puppy or what you feed your dog really affect dog training and your dogs ability to learn? The answer is YES, 100% yes. Your pups ability is learned and largely scheduled by you. Rescuing a dog or adopting a new puppy what and how you feed your dog ties into dog training. Potty issues, food drive for treats and territorial behaviors are learned. Here is my people training tips for the day. How, where, when and what you feed your puppy or dog most certainly dog can and does affect training and effects good and bad can be long lasting.  Most behavioral issues begin in the home and issues such as housebreaking and food based aggression can be innocently be triggered by you. 

Paws For A Minute®  Dog food, dog training and daily life with Fido. 

People treats and Fido facts: 7 Tips for creating Muttri-mony. 

  • Time feed your dog. When, how and what you feed your dog is directly tied in to housebreaking issues. Teaching your puppy to go “outside” potty is directly associated with meal time. Put food down for 15 min. only. Do so when you are home so your dog learns to eat in one sitting. 

  • Use correct portions. Puppy needs change as they grow. Many people end up over feeding or guessing on portion size. Hence, often creating a finicky eater or over feeding an adult dog and creating long term potty issues. 

  •  Check-in with your vet as to the amount of food for your size and breed. The back of the dog food bag cannot determine your own dogs exercise level. Growing pups need several meals yet adult dogs do not. 

  • Leaving food out all day for your dog to nibble is not a great idea. Dogs love routine. Leaving food in dog bowls can lead to possible behavioral issues. It can also create a finicky eater. Sort of a self fulfilling prophecy, the people who feel they need to leave food out so that their dog will eat, is actually creating less drive to eat.  If a dog does not eat at the same time of day they will also not go to the bathroom at the same time. 

  • Check dog food ingredients. What makes a dog food good for your dog should not just be judged only by your dog liking it. Some dogs will hover anything down others will not touch steak before they sniff it first. Training your dog and vet bills are tied to long term nutritional of your dogs needs being met. Check the back of the bag. Sugar should not be one of the ingredients in your dog food. Often blueberries and other antioxidants sometimes are the culprit to loose ( you know what) causing vet bills only to finally (through non conclusive tests to rule out other things ) switch brands to a more palatable food. The main protein of the food should be the first ingredient ( such as ) Chicken, Salmon etc.

  • A balanced diet= a less hyper dog and makes potty training easier with other training tips.  Puppy food is generally feed to a puppy until they are 1 years old. Then adult food takes over for maintenance. Senior food begins at age 7. 

  • Changing dog food to different brands. Always do so slowly over a 3 to 4 day span. Slowly add in the new food in small amounts increasing the amounts over several days. This prevents stomach upset.

Paws For A Mintute® Quick Puppy Training Tip

Paws For A Minute®

Providing a safe place and schedule for your new puppy creates a mellow puppy.

Mello puppy = happy person.

A Straight Up Answer About Having An 8 Week-Old Puppy

Paws For A Minute® / ASK INGER-Q&A
Question:
I recently purchased, Montauk, see attached. She is a beautiful 8 week-old
“miniature” english Bulldog. 
I have set her up with a crate and a small pen area in my kitchen – about 8ftx3ft in total. I had read a lot about crate training so had been taking her outside frequently over the first few days to go potty. I think she was beginning to understand and respond.
I live in New York City and went to the vet for the first time yesterday. He basically explained to me that as she has not had any vaccinations yet that she must stay inside at all times until the shots are completed when she is about 17 weeks-old. Do you agree with this? I definitely don’t want to put her in danger but feel that keeping her confined in this space for the next 8-weeks is hardly a good life?
In addition, if I am to keep her in the crated / fenced area. What should her schedule look like? Do I only take her out when I play with her (maybe twice) per day? For the rest of the time she is in the fenced area? And I should go about my normal day.
Really appreciate your help. No one seems to give straight answers.
                                                                                                - Richard
ANSWER:
Hey, thanks for the great questions. She’s gorgeous and congrats on the new puppy!
 Firstly, yes I do agree with your vet. The problem is that many pet professionals neglect to tell owner’s “why” they should so a certain protocol, hence the confusion. The reason (very young) pup’s should not go outdoors, until fully inoculated, is because they should receive a series of shots, which are complete at around 17-weeks. This is to prevent many viruses but an important one to note is called parvo, a very contagious illness that pup’s can pick up from there pads. The incubation of this type of virus is roughly 15 days and owners wouldn’t know it until their puppy gets sick. Vomiting and diarrhea are the symptoms and rapid dehydration can be the killer, literally. So that’s the main reason, however, remember your pup’s been on the planet only 8 weeks, what’s the hurry? Oh I know, housebreaking.
Yes, well, that’s the next topic of conversation, leaning to go poop outdoors!
Paws For A Minute® / new puppy 8 weeks-old
 Even if your puppy appears to be getting the concept of going to the bathroom outside, biologically she can’t hold it 8 hours (at 8-weeks of age) that happens in stages. So you could neurotically feel compelled to take our puppy outside 45 times a day, because pup’s that age poop a lot, but the truth is that she needs to grow in order to learn to hold the urge to go. Yes, training is apart of that, but your not accelerating the training process at this young age by thinking she understands. Your main mission right now is to teach your new puppy to self-soothe and begin to understand the process of where to go potty.Teaching when to go potty comes later
Learning to self-soothe means teaching your pup to chill by herself (within a safe space) such as a gated area. At 8-weeks a puppy’s day consists of  playing , eating, peeing, pooping, learn how to (go in and out) of the crate, chewing, and get to know you! Think infant. Sleeping in the gated area all night long is a big deal. Music or a sound machine will help. Keep papers or wee-wee pads in one end of the gated area. When you take her out of the gated space, take her out on a leash, and guide her to spot (on a patio or yard) for potty on a wee-wee pad. Dogs will learn by routine, so it’s up to you to set one. Don’t expect for them to just “get it,” cats do that, not dogs. Remember, even if a puppy stumbles out a patio door (that’s kept open) to go potty, doesn’t mean she’s even close to being housebroken. That happens from a combo of training and age! After she goes potty then it can be playtime with you, but for 20 minutes or so at a time! Remember, this can be many, many times a day! You can also hang inside the gated space with her.
You mentioned this type of routine is hardly the good life? Don’t think of it that way, she’s a baby. A ball rolling at that young age is a good time. Have fun and get to know each other. Just like a human baby, puppies at that stage; eat, play, pee, poop, sleep. Now, having said that, when your puppy becomes 12 or 14 weeks-old, the party begins. All papers in the gated space come up, the crate door shuts for periods of time, triggers of music get introduced, commands get implemented, teething starts and the housebreaking concept comes alive.  Stay tuned for stage two of the puppy process which is only a few weeks away. I hope this helped and helps others. Please keep us posted on your progress!

Does Your Dog Sleep In Your Bed? Good Idea or Bad?

Is it a good idea for your dog to sleep in your bed?

Many owners LOVE the concept of cuddles while getting their zzz’s, despite the potential dog hair issue. Often though, new dog owners wonder about when to start this life long ritual? Other’s end up questioning their original decision to allow their dog on the bed, if other training issues come into play.

Here are some dog owner tips to consider. Timing is everything! Allowing a very young “new” puppy to sleep in your bed too soon, can create a huge mixed signal. Sure the end goal may be to get snuggles all night long, however, allowing this to happen during the first few months of puppyhood can create separation anxiety later, when you attempt to leave for work or dinner. Many dogs can become codependent on you because they learn to feel safe only in your presents rather than being able to be secure alone in the house or yard. Teaching your new puppy to self-soothe (in an independent space) first, is really important. This training process is age related and sometimes crucial for new rescue pup’s that are already adult, but new to you and your lifestyle.

Issue’s can develop from allowing this nesting (in your bed) to happen too soon. Territorial behavior (over your bed) can occur, never getting housebroken, separation anxiety while being left alone, are a few issues that can develop, overtime, from allowing new dogs to sleep in your bed too soon.

For best results and an issue free experience, new puppy’s, like children, need to learn from you, a lifestyle pattern. Such as, where to go to the bathroom, how to hold the urge, what to chew on and how to be alone. After you have achieved all of that and a bit of obedience training, then you can both knock yourself out with some sweet dreams for the next 15 years.

 

Housebreaking A New Puppy: Do’s and Don’ts

Housebreaking a new puppy or dog happens in stages. The dog owner training is what needs to happen first! Since your puppy or new dog  is looking to you for guidance, I figured I would help you understand the basic philosophy behind the housebreaking concept.

Paws For A Minute® Housebreaking a new puppy Philosophy

Dogs are den animals and they love small spaces. Your first mission as a new dog owner is to create a small space within your home for your new pup. Use a baby gate to create an area. This can be achieved with a corral pen too. Within that gated space put a crate and keep the crate door open. This allows your new puppy to go in and out of the crate at it’s leisure and slowly learn to self soothe. It’s important for a new puppy to be able to learn to be independent from you while you are HOME and yet still see out. This helps establish a pattern and a system of being able to see you walk around the house yet still be in a puppy proofed space. Sure you can allow your puppy to have free time with you but while you are acclimating your new dog to your lifestyle and home it’s important to teach your puppy to be able to be alone and respect the boundary of a baby gate. Your puppy will quickly learn to relax in the gated area.

The gated area will ultimately help aid teaching your puppy to hold the urge to go to the bathroom and help create a schedule. However, the first stage of housebreaking is to teach a puppy to except the boundary of the gated space, learn to naturally den in the crate by allowing him to go in and out of the crate by himself with out shutting the crate door on him. The first week of owning a 8 week-week old puppy it’s okay to have puppy pads at one end of the gated area for the first few days.

Don’t stand over the gate or corral and talk baby talk at your new puppy. This will make him jump up on the the gate and eventually teach him to want to get out. Never shut a door on a puppy or a new dog. This creates anxiety. Even if that’s the end goal with a trained dog. More housebreaking tips to come…