New Trend: L.A Pet Foundation’s Lead A New Paws-a-tive Perspective To The Pet Store Concept

A new trend in Los Angeles is helping to change the face of pet stores. Many animal foundations are redefining the “pet store” concept to include “only” rescued shelter pups. The concept has been emerging over the past few years, but now picking up steam.

During  the past 20 years the pet industry has tripled and so has the volume of breeders good and bad. The internet and local pet stores are inundated with breeding facilities who follow a trend of popular pups, designer or not. The internet competition of where to get your Lassie-like idea of your next BFF is an underground web of confusion in this furry internet secret society. 

In other words, the rescues and shelters can’t stop the puppy mill or internet breeders. They can only educate us to be responsible and provide help for the pups in the pound. Only we can change with awareness, education and knowledge to ask the right questions. USDA (United States department of Agriculture) are legal commercial kennel facilities that produce mass puppies often sold to pet stores. That’s not to say all breeders are bad, it’s truly buyer beware and education on how, where, and who to get a puppy from, that’s lacking to the general public.

The puppy mill breeders appear behind internet sources and pet stores providing cute puppy faces and sometimes make deals with pet stores. The breeding conditions aren’t known (behind a website or from a store) and a seemingly heathy puppy within a year can have chronic ailments due to bad breeding or not having the  proper training (due to lack of puppy parent education) hence, they’re turned into the shelter. By the way, not all rescue pups are in ill health. I personally have a rescue pup that will turn 17 years old in August. She’s in perfect health for her age! 

The rescues keep plucking the best out of the pounds urging people to spay and neuter and adopt, but the cycle continues. All topics are important issue’s that contribute to the approximate 10 Million animals a year that get euthanized across the U.S shelters, costing tax payers roughly 2 Billion dollars to execute. 

Congratulations to the many animal foundations who are making their way into main stream retailers! This provides the space and appeal to “rescue” a puppy while shopping in a local shopping mall. Spot! (West Hollywood) , Love and Leashes (West Los Angeles) and Adopt and Shop (Mission Vejo, CA)  to name a few. Many people want to rescue yet the local animal shelter can be a sad depressing place or not local. The great thing about these types of stores is that they provide more than just puppies. Often a more mature pet is your ideal lifestyle pick. Viola, love at-first-sight! A store front environment changes the appeal and makes recycling a paws-a-tive gift! 

 Found Animals Foundation who  is a privately funded operating foundation in Los Angeles that focuses on a few powerful levers for changing the outcome for millions of animals euthanized each year in the US. Working with local communities and animal care professionals, we deliver innovative community-based adoption, spay/neuter, and pet ID programs while offering a wealth of trusted educational resources. Bravo! 

Must-know Checklist For Senior Dogs

Paws For A Minute® Quick Tip

Dog Owner Checklist for Senior Dogs

1. When your dog turns 6 years old have a complete medical examination with your vet.

2.  Examine your dog occasionally when cuddling for lumps and bumps.

3. Have your dogs teeth cleaned. This can prevent major problems in the future. This is very important, especially for toy breed dogs.

4. Speak to your vet about your dogs food. Nutritional needs change over time. Adding a few supplements or changing your dogs food to a senior diet could be needed.

5.  Aging dogs sleep longer and deeply. Dog parents with children need to remember to recheck their reality. What was and still is a nice dog may have physical changes happening that we aren’t aware of (such as sight changes and hearing loss) due to the aging process. Even the nicest dog can snap at a child how is approaching their dog to pat it while sleeping.  Note any changes in your dog and communicate this to your children or create a new schedule for your dog as to where he/she naps.  If you have young children, creating a baby gated space for your aging dog to sleep will protect both.

6. Do some training on a leash! Yup, bring back the puppy in your older dog. The leash will formalize this fun exercise and really create the focus and attention your older dog will love then go through some old tricks. Your older dog will love the attention and praise for this accomplishment. Training also enables you to see if your dog is hearing or seeing properly. Changes can happen subtly but go un noticed. As your dog ages it’s common to go into a bit of a  “dog owner denial” and think our dog is just being stubborn, when really other changes might be taking place. 

7. Become aware of your dogs water intake. This can be an indicator of changes on the way and vet’s welcome new information. Noting water intake changes, eating and sleeping habits help guide your vet too in helping to Always check with your vet.

Top 5 Dog Breeds For Families With Kids

Raising children and a puppy can be an awesome experience, yet challenging at the same time if you’re not sure what your doing. Raising a puppy means housebreaking and lots of poop, not unlike raising a child in diapers. The good news is that a puppy’s developmental process happens a lot faster, all within the first year. Sure, the concept of puppies and children seems amazing but can be a lot of work if your not prepared. Success largely depends on your time, previous experience, lifestyle match of the breed of dog you pick and your child’s age.

Puppies are great, but remember they loose their teeth during a teething stage and that sweet 8 week-old angel you got can quickly turn into Cujo for a short period of time. Navigating through this puppy stage with children around and doing it gracefully is the key to success.

It’s all manageable if you’re organized and know how to surf through the housebreaking and chewing phase of puppyhood. Choosing the right breed, size and temperament to match your lifestyle is key!

 

 

There are many breeds and mixes that awesome when raised with children. Success depends on your former experience, time and lifestyle. Choosing the right breed and temperament to match your family and lifestyle is so important. If you and your partner aren’t seasoned dog owners, then choosing certain breeds can be more challenging to raise than others. The following examples are some of easier breeds to manage in terms of size and innate temperament for the first time dog owner that has children. Remember, a puppy is a puppy, no matter what breed you choose!  Mastering a great experience is all in the process of how you raise, train and housebreak your puppy.  Dogs can live a long time, up to 15 years and beyond. So if you’re contemplating getting a puppy for your child, remember it’s your new baby, first.

1. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

This breed is a great starter dog for families with children. They must be trained and well socialized. Housebreaking and addressing separation anxiety in puppyhood ( like with all breeds) is important. In general, the King Charles Spaniel has a sweet, loving and easy temperament. They are playful and love to chase birds or butterflies but generally do not possess super high-prey drive.

 

 

Pros:

  • Size is manageable (they average about 12″ to 13″ at the shoulders and weigh about 13-20 lbs) as adults.
  • Love to snuggle and lay in your lap.
  • Are playful but not in your face self assured.
  • Pretty mellow and easy-going with children, other dogs and older people.
  • Great size for traveling. Generally will fit into traveling bags and not take up too much space in the car.
  • Come in many colors. Black and tan, red and white, ruby (red), and tricolor (black tan and white)
  • They are not super territorial in nature, which averts many issues concerning children.
Cons:
  • Can have health problems. Choosing the right breeder is important.
  • Do shed but not tiny needle hairs like pugs and other short haired breeds
  • Are so cute many people do not train them early one. Often resulting with separation anxiety issues.

2. Bichon Frise

A lovely choice for families with young children. This white fluff ball breed is a happy, very cheerful, non-shedding and make great companions. They make great apartment dogs and an easy size for travel, and happy go lucky in nature and generally not hyper. Their nature is playful and intelligent yet very tolerant of children and good with elderly people.

 

 

Pros:

  • Non shedding
  • Cute
  • Oder less
  • Not terribly territorial or yappy
  • fun, loving and ready to play and easy to train

Cons:

  • Regular grooming is a must. Brushing is essential because hair gets matted.
  • Painful hair mats need to be cut out if not groomed properly.
  • Grooming means bath, haircuts and blow drying to keep mats at bay.
  • Hair around the eyes can stain if not cleaned often.
  • $$ -Grooming costs can get expensive and need to be done monthly.
  • They are so cute, many do not formally train them or get them housebroken early in puppyhood. Hence, they can be labeled difficult to housebreak. This is not true. It’s up to the owner to achieve this by understanding how to accomplish this stage during puppyhood.

3. Shorty Jack Russell 

Some people feel that the Jack Russell Terrier is a hyper breed. However, this breed comes in many versions. The short-legged Irish and or English “shorty” jack as they’re referred to can be a calm loving lap dog, with a little zip! Training is key to this breed, yet once trained they are sturdy, lovely playful happy dogs, who can do very well with children. They come with many coat types: smooth, broken and rough. Ironically the rough or long coat version is known to shed less.

 

Pros:

  • Funny looking and come in many colors and crazy cute markings
  • Very smart and easy to train
  • Great travel size 8″ to 12″ at the shoulders and weigh 8 to 15 lbs
  • Many say they are like potato chips.. you can’t have just one
  • Good with children
  • Do well with structure and rules. Training is a must.
  • Can become ball-o-hollics which makes exercising them easy
  • Rugged, athletic and calm all in the same day.
Cons:
  • They shed a lot. The short coats have small needle like hair similar to Labs, Chihuahua’s and Pugs. The broken coats look like they don’t shed as much, but they do. The rough coated ones shed less but look more like a Benji type dog.
  • Must be apart of the family. Not a dog to be kept in the yard alone or to get bored.
  • Training and exercise must be included in your daily schedule from puppyhood through adulthood.

4. Miniature or Standard Poodle

This breed often gets a bad wrap because of their hair cuts, but in reality they are rugged, very smart, sturdy and fun dogs. Not foo-foo at all! Hence, the ever popular Labradoodle hy-bred of Lab- Poodle cross. The real deal comes in many colors, four sizes and is awesome with children. No need to go designer mix.

 

 

Pros:

  • Smart, fun, athletic with an easy going nature
  • Comes in a variety of sizes from a tiny tea cup to Standard big dog size of 70 lbs
  • Easy to train and housebreak if you put the effort into it
  • The toy, miniature or standard sizes are best for families with small children
  • Does not shed
  • You can keep this dog in a puppy cut for life, avoiding the known Poodle cut and stereotype.

 

Cons:

  • Grooming costs can add up. Haircuts needed regularly.
  • Can get ear infections due to floppy ear set. Ear cleaning is important for prevention.
  • Must train. If not they can get anxious and be prone to nervous reactions only due to a lack of understanding and training.

5. French Bulldog

This cute. small sturdy breed can be wonderful with children. Small enough for children to  play with, but a little too heavy for a child to actually pick up. They are awesome apartment dogs and do not need HUGE amounts of exercise comparable to other breeds.  They can weigh anywhere from 18 to 28 lbs as adults.

 

 

Pros:

  • Easy to train if owners are educated to their puppyhood needs.
  • Lovely with children
  • Easy grooming care. Wash and go.
  • Exercise needs are manageable
Cons:
  • Shed
  • They can get gassy and can have delicate stomach issues.
  • Snore when they sleep
  • Tend to drool occasionally
  • Known to have health some issues down the road

Please remember that all pure bred dogs are available in your local shelters and rescues. If choosing a breeder, choose carefully and really do your research!

Is Your Dog Toddler- Proof? Dog Training Tips For Parents

Toddlerhood can be a hair raising experience for many parents. If you think about it, even your family dog may have to make some quick moves in order to get out of the way of a toddler going through the terrible two’s. Well, there is a way to prepare. Did you know that 70% of all dog bites come from the family dog?

Yup, even the sweet dogs can snap at the unpredictable movements of a toddler. Albeit called an accident, you can prevent this type of mistake from happening. Remember It’s up to you “the parent” not to rely on the sweetness of your dog. Awareness is the key ingredient to a successful integration and bond between you and your family dog.

Paws For A Minute® Quick tip

Toddler proofing your pet / Child and dog safety series. 

 1. Pick up all chew bones when your dog and baby are loose together. Remember, toddlers take naps leaving an ideal time for your dog to have freedom in your home. Always dog proof your home from loose bones, dog food and other possible possessive toys that may create a territorial response when both (your toddler and dog) are together loose in the house.

2. Be aware of whether your dog is seeking cover underneath furniture. Hiding under chairs and tables is a sign that your dog does not want to be messed with by the baby. As the parent, it’s best to see this as a sign and not police your toddler or your dog.

3. Monitor your dogs responses to your child. Redirect your baby or your dog to a new item of fascination. It might be best to create a temporary baby gated space for your dog to be in the house,  while your toddler explores. Give your dog free time during less active moments.

 

Pets and Parenting: Mom Training Tips For Toddler’s And The Family Dog

Preparing your dog for your child’s toddlerhood is really important! Depending on your dogs age, previous exposure to children, food, toys and chew bones will help determine where you need to focus training and socialization. 

Just because your dog is nice and gentle with you and other adult people doesn’t mean a child can’t become a target, by accident! Some parents unknowingly deem their dog good with kid’s or fine with the baby but with toddlers, I think special a wild card factor can happen. Toddlers can be kind of unpredictable and many parents get in the habit of chanting “be nice to the doggy!” Having foresight and be able to direct or protect your dog and child is the key.  Snaps can happen fast and after that, it matters less who’s fault it was becomes the damage is done.

Paws For A Minute® Quick tip: Preparing Your Dog For Your Child’s Toddlerhood!

1. Dog Tip:  Review all “on leash” commands. This is a great way to tune up your dog. Basic commands like heel, sit, stay and come. Never did that before? Then now is a great opportunity! Leash training is a great way to create eye contact between you and your dog and reinforce the commands with praise! What it does very effectively is creates a bond and an understanding that simply off leash repetition and cookie’s don’t accomplish in the same way, A few minutes a day will help communicate volumes to your dog and create trust between you, especially with a new creature that’s crawling and falling all over there territory now!

2. Dog Tip: Occasionally, hand feed you dog a few servings of his kibble. This helps determine any food bowl issues and get your dog used to being interrupted while eating.

3. Dog Tip: Vet check. Bring your dog to the vet for a check up. Dogs that are 5 years and up should be checked for lumps and bumps. As your Toddler begins to poke and pat you want to make sure all is well with your dog health wise. Some times older dogs don’t feel well and YOU would never know it.

4. Dog Tip: Use a baby gate occasionally for your dog when your child is crawling around. Boundary’s are a great thing. Get your dog used to being baby gated once in a while. This allows you not to go insane and gives your dog some chew bone time in peace, yet still allows him/her to hang out and be apart of things. 

Key: Guide your dog into the gated area on a leash, before your toddler has exploration time. The leash helps create a fun ritual, with the formality of a command. Say the word let’s go and then once in the gates area say “wait” then give a treat close the gate and take of the leash! Gate for a small increment of time in a central area.

5. Dog tip:  Brush your dog for 5 minutes every week. This is a great way to get him used to being touched, everywhere even the tail!

 

 

Paws For A Minute® Puppy Guide 2012: How to Find The Best Puppy.

So you’re looking for a new puppy but don’t know where to begin? The Puppy Guide 2011/12 is here to get you started on the right track to perfect muttrimony! It’s so easy to say “I want a new puppy” but, yet much harder to determine where to look, what to look for and, ultimately, decide which pup is right for your home.

Paws for a Minute® Puppy Guide 2012: How To Find That Perfect New Pup To Fit Your Lifestyle

Know Thy Self: Picking a puppy is not easy. There are so many different breeds and many different personalities within a given breed that it’s tough to know where to begin the search. I suggest you start by thinking about your own lifestyle. Ask yourself some key questions and answer them honestly:

Are you active? Are you a couch potato? Do you travel a lot? Are you single or married? Do you have roommates? Do you have other pets? Are you a parent? How old are your children? What’s the energy level like in your home? Have you had dogs before? Are you allergic?

The answers to these questions will give you a much better idea of what type of dog and temperament will fit comfortably in your daily life. Think about the following questions and or concerns: size, exercise needs of the breed, your time and lifestyle, allergies, does you your financial budget include raising a dog, does the breed you like shed? Once you know roughly what your lifestyle and budget allows then it’s time to start researching breeds.

Do Your Homework: When picking a breed remember that there are always exceptions to the rule. Not every puppy is going to grow up to have the temperament described in the breed’s standard.  In general, go with three top favorites and investigate from there. Another great idea is to visit a local dog park. There you will find many owners with dogs you may be interested in, and be able to ask questions and seek out more information and match your expectations with their experience.

More Food For Thought: It’s not just personality and size that matter most. You should also consider any additional health risks or issues associated with a given breed. There are many breeds out there that have well-known chronic health issues. Issues prevail over time so you may not recognize such conditions during puppyhood. The problem may not prevail in all dogs of that breed but it could potentially mean LOTS of vet bills later so know your facts before hand and rule out anything you’re not prepared to handle.

Where To Buy Your Pup: First and foremost, be wary of online puppy stores and/or breeders. The internet is a great place to do your research but actually buying a puppy on the web usually ends bad. Whether it’s as severe as a rip-off scam or simply buying a puppy mill pup, you may get burned and it’s definitely going to cost you. In the long run you will save time, money and perhaps some emotional distress if you find a reliable breeder, rescue group or shelter. You can always find very reputable breeders on the America Kennel Club site. Or a great thing to do is visit any dog show in your local area. These shows are always hosted by breed or all breed events by a kennel club (such as AKC) there you can meet great people who breed professionally.  Also, keep in mind that nearly every breed has a rescue organization in nearly every major city. Always ask the right questions and make sure to visit them in person. That way you can meet greet and inspect their facilities and get a sense of how they treat their animals. Usually, your gut will guide you to make the right decision.

Good Questions To Ask Breeders

Who are the dog’s parents? Can I meet the parents? Do you have info on the dog’s bloodline? Where are the dogs kept? Can I see your housing facilities? Are there any health issues or risks in this bloodline? Do you have any certifications? Do the dogs have any medical certifications? Do you like the person you are speaking to?

Good Questions To Ask Shelters How old is the dog? Do you have any history on this dog? How long has the dog been in the shelter? Has it ever been adopted and returned? Where are the dogs kept and does it have any outstanding behaviors associated with being approached or while being fed? Can I see the housing facilities? Is the dog spayed or neutered? Does the dog have it’s shots with proper documentation?

Also, steer clear of “puppy stores.” Any shop with puppies playing in the window usually gets their dogs from large-scale puppy mills. Any puppy paper or pedigree that says USDA on it is not a fancy title or kennel. It means the kennel the puppy came from is a commercial one. It stands for United States Department of Agriculture and is one that’s zoned for breeding very large amounts of dogs. There are brokers who farm out these pup’s from other sources to the web and pet stores. The store itself may not even realize it! Not only should you not support this practice for the simple fact that they increase dog populations and we’re already in an overpopulation crisis in most cities but for the dogs themselves. Many puppy mill puppies are bred from dogs with genetic disorders, health issues or other problems that will likely cost you in vet bills later.

If you want the Pet Shop experience but would like to rescue a dog, look into facilities like Found Animals’ Adopt & Shop. This is a great option because you get to walk around and shop as though you were in the puppy store but at the end of the day you are really rescuing a dog from the shelter. What’s also great is that many shelter have older puppies, say 5 months and up.  If you are in LA, Adopt & Shop is a fantastic choice. If not, look online for a similar initiative near you. It’s worth it!

 

5 Must-Have Training Tips To Prepare Your Dog For Holidays And Children. Wild Ones.

Congrats, you made it, you have it all and your living the dream. The house, the kids and now you have the dog! Or even if you don’t and all you have are a slew of fur kids and the human kind only come to visit, I thought I’d give you some basic tips that can help around the holidays. Approximately,  5 Million children get bitten by a dog a year in the U.S. and the main culprit? The family dog. 

Unpredictable children, shy dogs and add a little food dropped on the flor and that’s a recipe for a potential disaster!  Not good or merry, if that happens.

Your dog is counting on you to create some boundaries. Dogs often see children as submissive beings. In other words, dogs see children as they would another dog. Which means they want to play, nip, chase and growl even warn or snap.You need to be aware. Not every dog is used to being around kids. Sometimes it’s a size issue others it’s an age issue and fluffy cute dogs are the biggest target.  Think about it, your relatives dog is not always socialized trained or used to being around kids.

The main thing to be careful of is furniture, dogs and small children. Dogs go underneath chairs and tables. They may growl and a young child does NOT heed to the growl.  Growl is a warning that I’m going to bite. Not if, when. 

Paws For A Minute: Holidays- Child and Dog Safety 

1. Time feed your dog.

In other words do not leave the food out at all times. Create a feeding time for your dog. Put the food down for 20 minutes and if your dog does not finish “sorry Charlie” until the next feeding. I know your thinking not a problem…my dog wolfs his food. However, some dogs may be finicky eaters and this is not a great thing around kids. You don’t want your dog to be or become food possessive, even if he never has been before!   This can be especially true with older dogs and young children. Baby gating your dog in a space so he can eat in peace helps too.

 

2. Exercise, before the feast.

A tired dog is a great dog. Especially before people come over. So best to schedule the time. If you are going to let your dog and your children play together try to tire your dog out first. I know who has the time. But really if you can play fetch or let your dog rip around the back yard for a few minutes before the kids especially toddlers go outside this will help. Large breed puppies can over power kids unless they get their ya-ya’s out first.

 

3. Walk your dog around the house for a few minutes on the leash.

Sounds crazy I know… but this is especially helpful with young exuberant dogs and toddlers or small children.  Walk around your living room and when you stop pull gently up on the leash and ask your dog to sit. This will create eye contact from your dog. Then you can praise him.

This technique sets a positive tone for your dog and calms him/her down, instead of busting into a room and mowing down a child. Children get to see the dog and perhaps give a treat in a controlled manner. If your dog goes koo-koo on the leash, then quickly pivot and say lets go. Walk a few steps to change the focus while using a upbeat voice, This will redirect the initial barking.  Lastly and obviously, if your dog simply isn’t good with children then don’t risk it.

4. No rough play

I know sorry Dad’s.  It sends a mixed signal to the dog. Avoid games like tug of war. Not good, it promotes growling.  Remember your little kids are like playmates to your dog. Therefore rough play can transfer to your dog wanting to tackle your kid.

5. Teach your dog to fetch

Create a ball-o-holic out of your dog. This is a great activity for the kids to play with the dog. Parents need to implement it first. This is a great way to bond and interact. It takes the intensity off the child and dog and onto a ball. The child gets to watch and participate. Here’s how… The key is to use one special fetch ball. Keep it in a special place and only use it during the game of fetch. When teaching your dog to fetch use anticipation as the incentive.

Ask our dog to sit. Then throw the ball as you say o.k. As your dog gets the ball, crouch down and clap your hands, praising your dog. As he runs towards you take a treat out of your pocket suddenly stand up and say sit. Your dog will spit out the ball for the treat. Then begin again. The key is to only throw the ball twice then put the ball away. The next day throw it three times, the next day four, etc.

Before your know it you will have a bona fide ball-o-hollic. Then your kids can take over and have a fun safe game to play with your dog


Hot New Kid Christmas Toy, That What? Oh,You Might Already Have One At Home.

 

What’s the hottest toy to get your kid for the holidays?

Crazy, but true. The hottest toy for the holidays may take you by surprise. It retails at Walmart for $25.00 to $30.00, kids are going wild for it. What is it?  You may even have one at home, that does it naturally. It’s a Dachshund that poops! Yup, check it out.

 

Dachshund Doggie Doo Game

The world renown pooping dog game! In Germany it’s called Kackel Dackel, which means Pooping Dachshund. Kid’s are flipping out over this. Maybe this will help teach other family members to help with the real family dog.

You can get it on-line: www.petmywiener.com

 What are your thoughts about this? Do you dig it, or not?  Tell us what you think!  Would you get this toy for your kid?

Is Your BabySitter Afraid Of Your Dog? 5 Must-Have Dog Owner TIps

Grabbing your keys, kissing the kids and rushing out the door, is a familiar scenario to most busy moms. Introducing your dog to your babysitter ‘formally,” is not. 

Recently, one my dog client’s babysitter asked me to please write about this topic. She explained that not everyone has trained dogs and over the years, she has been growled at by some of “the nicest dogs.”

How do you address the situation if you feel uneasy with someone’s dog? She had been babysitting for a family that had a dog that was middle aged, rather scary in appearance, at least to her, and not trained. Nothing really happened but the dogs behavior was spooky to her when owners where gone. She wasn’t sure how to deal with it.

People who are not comfortable with dogs can misinterpret a stare as having a different meaning. She was told by the owners to just ignore him, as they left to go out to dinner.

Sound familiar? Many dog owners have the “great” family dog who may be getting a little older, set in it’s ways and/or giving off a vibe that is either misunderstood or needs to be acknowledged by the people who own him.

Even if there are no new behavioral changes with your dog, often the babysitter never gets a proper introduction with the family dog. This can lead to a big misunderstanding and possible trouble. A great thing to note is that someone else’s fear can create a mixed signal for your dog, especially when you are not in the house. So it’s up to you as the owner to be aware and make sure all is cool. 

1. A great thing to do is to get your dog a regular vet check. Not just annual shots.

2. Notice behavioral changes and make sure any “new” quiet behavior is not mistaken for pain.

3. Take the time to ask your babysitter about their past dog experiences. You may find out that they like dogs (in general) but that they have been bitten in the past and are cautious.

4. Awareness is key. The more information you have the better prepared you are to ease and address issue’s you did even know existed.

5. Finally, take the time to formally introduce your dog to new babysitters, even if only for 10 minutes. Do so on Leash with treats with a great, well adjusted dog. If you have trouble brewing then a private trainer or group obedience class in a must.

I recommend doing so on a leash and show off “obedience” commands to the babysitter. The leash adds an exciting element to the process and focus and will make all, feel comfortable. Treats, of course, help finish off the introduction with some Emmy Award winning tricks. This awareness can ward off any silent problem that may have been brewing behind your back. It will create the best possible experience for everyone!